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Showing posts from 2013

Guide to Online Birth Indexes for Cook County: Which Ones to Use When (with links)

Handy Links to the Indexes Mentioned in this Post Cook County Birth Registers, 1871-1915 (FamilySearch) Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878-1922 (FamilySearch) Cook County, Illinois, Birth Certificates Index, 1871-1922  (Ancestry) Cook County, Illinois Birth Index, 1916-1935 (Ancestry) Historical Cook County Illinois Vital Records  (Cook County Clerk) This is the last of a series of three posts focusing on the Chicago and Cook County vital records indexes that are available online. In this article, I'll give you links to the Cook County birth indexes that I use regularly and summarize their strengths and limitations to help you decide which one(s) will work best for your search. Once you've found an index entry, the records can be obtained from a number of different places but the rule of thumb is this: get records from 1923 forward from the the Cook County Clerk's Office ($15 + a handling fee if you buy the records online at  www.cookcountygenealogy.com

Guide to Online Marriage Indexes for Cook County: Which Ones to Use When (with links)

Handy Links to the Indexes Mentioned in this Post Cook County, Illinois, Marriage and Death Indexes, 1833-1889  (Ancestry) Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900  (Illinois Secretary of State) Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920  (FamilySearch) Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920  (Ancestry) Cook County, Illinois Marriage Indexes, 1912-1942  (Ancestry) Cook County, Illinois Marriage Index, 1930-1960  (Ancestry) Historical Cook County Illinois Vital Records  (Cook County Clerk) This is the second in a series of three posts focusing on the Chicago and Cook County vital records indexes that are available online. In this article, I'll give you links to the Cook County marriage indexes that I use regularly and summarize their strengths and limitations to help you decide which one(s) will work best for your search. Once you've found an index entry, the records can be obtained from a number of different places but the rule of thumb is this:

Guide to Online Death Indexes for Chicago: Which Ones to Use When (with links)

Handy Links to the Indexes Mentioned in this Post Illinois, Cook County Death Certificates, 1878-1922, 1959-1994  (FamilySearch) Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947  (FamilySearch) Illinois Statewide Death Index, Pre-1916  (Illinois Secretary of State) Illinois Statewide Death Index, 1916-1947  (Illinois Secretary of State) Cook County, Illinois Death Index, 1908-1988  (Ancestry) Cook County Genealogy, Certificates 20 Years or Older  (Cook County Clerk) If you're searching for Chicago and Cook County death records, there are a number of overlapping online indexes to choose from. In this post, I'll give you links to the indexes I use regularly and summarize their strengths and limitations to help you decide which one(s) will work best for your search. Once you've found an index entry, the records can be obtained from a number of different places but the rule of thumb is this: get records up through 1947 from microfilm available through Family History Cent

How to Find EDs using alookatcook.com

I'm writing this post as a quick response to a  Chicago Genealogy Facebook page  question about how to use an address to determine a 1920 Census ED using the maps found on alookatcook.com . 1) Find the address using Google Maps. I'm going to try 2711 Hillock. 2) Once you've found the address, note the large cross streets. In this case, the canal/river is prominent and I notice that the address is southwest of the curve. 3) Go to alookatcook.com and click on the 1920 Ward map. 4) Notice how prominent the canal is. Based on the Google map, I guess that the address is part or the 4th ward so I click on the number 4 to see the map of EDs within the ward. 5) Going back to the Google map, I look for large streets and try to find them on the ED map. I see that the address is west of Halsted and south of Cermak. Does that help? Yes. I see Halsted on the ED map so that narrows down the eastern border. 6) I go back to the Google map and look for other streets close to

Requesting Images from FamilySearch's Photoduplication Services

Note: The Photoduplication Service mentioned in this blog post are no longer available.  In a previous post, Some Images No Longer Available on FamilySearch , I noted that the FamilySearch Wiki article on Illinois, Cook County Death Records  mentioned that digital images could be obtained through FamilySearch's Photoduplication Services . In order to be able to better answer questions about the service, I decided to try it myself. Submitting the Test Request On January 29, I sent an email asking for a copy of a New York City church baptismal record for Sarah Catherine Trafford. She appears on my husband's family tree and it was a record that we sincerely wanted. I provided a link to the FamilySearch index entry and included the index information. I also provided my name, address, telephone number, and email address, as requested. Reply to the Test Request Today I received an email with the subject "You have received a file from photoduplication Shared." It inc

Valentines on Our Family Tree

Sarah Ann Valentine Burr Ackley My husband and I have three Valentines on our family tree--Valentine Mink, Valentine Smith, and Sarah Ann Valentine. I love them all. Valentine Mink was born in Germany in 1805 but lived much of his life as a farmer in Floyd, New York. He carefully crafted his will to divide his estate fairly among his children. “The Cow or the thirty five Dollars that I gave to Janetta C. and the Horse or one hundred and twenty Dollars that I give to my sons George Franklin and John Philip is to make them equal to the elder children and not be included in the one eighth which each of them is to have.” I love him for that. Valentine Smith was born in Chicago in 1873. As a descendant of an early settler and successful entrepreneur, she inherited a place in society that gave her the freedom to focus on her passions and one of them was history. She served, briefly, as Chicago’s first archivist and spearheaded a number of important local history projects. Many people

Some Chicago Images No Longer Available on FamilySearch

This morning I received an email from a fellow researcher mentioning that the images for  Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1922  are no longer available online at FamilySearch. Unfortunately, it's true. The same is true for the Cook County birth register, birth certificate, and marriage license collections. On a positive note, the indexes remain. Two steps forward + one step back still = one step forward for Chicago researchers. If you visit the FamilySearch Wiki page Illinois, Cook County Death Records  and scroll down to the "Image Visibility" section, it explains that a new contract has been negotiated with Cook County and that the records were removed as part of that agreement. The article continues on to explain that "FamilySearch will receive an additional 4.7 million records for FamilySearch patrons." I don't know what that means, but I hope it's good news. If you need access to the images that were removed, the Wiki page offers three sugg